????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????Over the past three weeks, we have been witnessing history in the making.  Egyptians have had enough of their government and are demanding changes.  But if you are following the events through the major news outlets, you may notice that story barely goes beyond Tahrir Square and the demand that Honsi Mubarak to step down. What this story is really about is ‘place’ and ‘relationships’.  By place I mean Egypt; the banks of the Nile, the once fertile bottomlands and mysterious arid deserts, the landscape and climate that has shaped this culture for millennia. The rich relationships people have forged with this special place are broken.  In its place poverty, inequity, poor health and lack of education have resulted in polluted waters, contaminated soils and dirty air, giving rise to untold despair and hopelessness.  It is no wonder that these Egyptians want a better life, a life that recognizes human rights, fairness and justice.  A life that is reconnected to clean air, fresh water and fertile soils.  A life of rich relationships and a connection to all living things and the natural systems in which they depend on.  A life of opportunity and true wealth.  The wholeness of life.

Further Reading

Meet Assistant Construction Project Team Leader Bryan Sullivan
Meet Conservation Biologist Nolan Schillerstrom
Get to know Allyson Gibson, Biohabitats Extern
Get to Know Graphic Designer Joey Marshall
Evolution: A New Leadership Team for Biohabitats

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