????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????Over the past three weeks, we have been witnessing history in the making.  Egyptians have had enough of their government and are demanding changes.  But if you are following the events through the major news outlets, you may notice that story barely goes beyond Tahrir Square and the demand that Honsi Mubarak to step down. What this story is really about is ‘place’ and ‘relationships’.  By place I mean Egypt; the banks of the Nile, the once fertile bottomlands and mysterious arid deserts, the landscape and climate that has shaped this culture for millennia. The rich relationships people have forged with this special place are broken.  In its place poverty, inequity, poor health and lack of education have resulted in polluted waters, contaminated soils and dirty air, giving rise to untold despair and hopelessness.  It is no wonder that these Egyptians want a better life, a life that recognizes human rights, fairness and justice.  A life that is reconnected to clean air, fresh water and fertile soils.  A life of rich relationships and a connection to all living things and the natural systems in which they depend on.  A life of opportunity and true wealth.  The wholeness of life.

Further Reading

Pandemic Pause
E+D Podcast with Keith Bowers: The state of ecology and design in landscape architecture
Living Infrastructure: Green is great, but alive is even better
Water, Equity, and Ecology in Urban Planning
Composting Toilets: When Nature Calls

More From This Author

Food Security: Shout it from the rooftop (and parking lot)!
There Is No Sustainability Without Ecology
Cultivating our collective health and well-being: Pathways to Planetary Health
Looking Back to Move Forward – Celebrating Ecological Restoration
Landscape Restoration in North Korea