2081 Clipper Park Road Baltimore MD 21211

Thoughts on Salamanders

Throughout much of human history, the arrival of the vernal equinox has been celebrated through rituals. But we are not the only creatures with springtime rituals. Here in the Northern Hemisphere, in streams and vernal pools, many amphibians are engaging in their annual spring mating rituals. In this issue of Leaf Litter, we’ve…
read more ›

John Muir is dead. Muir lives.

On Christmas Eve, one hundred years ago, John Muir’s spirit left his body and set off into the pathless wild. Help us celebrate Muir and his legacy through the resurgence of a parks and wilderness movement focused on protecting the wild. Check out this essay by Tom Butler and Eileen Crist: John Muir's Last Stand …
read more ›

What if the People’s Climate March had Included Plants & Animals?

According to the latest estimates, nearly 400,000 people gathered in New York City this past Sunday to participate in the People's Climate March. Thousands more took part in similar events in London, Paris, Istanbul, Jakarta, and other parts of the world. Photos of the massive turnout, timed to precede today's UN Climate Summit, dominated yesterday's news and social…
read more ›

Keith Bowers WVU Commencement Speech

    WVU 2014 Commencement Speech delivered by Keith Bowers, President of Biohabitats Davis School of Agricutlure, Natural Resources and Design Keith Bowers   Thank you, Dean Robison, for that introduction. I am truly honored to be with you today for your commencement. Personally, I believe you are all graduating from…
read more ›

Integrated Water Strategies: Thinking outside the pipe

Despite the realities faced by many regions of the world today--record droughts, increased water scarcity, aging stormwater infrastructure and related pollution--many of us still take water for granted. When we need it, we turn on a faucet, pipes bring it in, and when we’re done, it drains down a pipe and out of our…
read more ›

Ecocidal Despair

This morning, my colleague Amy shared an article from this weekend's New York Times Magazine entitled "It's the End of the World as We Know it...and He Feels Fine." It's about author, one time deputy editor of The Ecologist, and former environmental activist Paul Kingsnorth, who now now says,"We aren't going to stop climate change"…
read more ›

Thoughts on Threatened Species

Thoughts on Threatened Species It is true that in nature, species come and species go. On rare occasions they even return. Just last week, a globally rare plant, Lobelia boykinii (Boykin's lobelia), resurfaced in Delaware, a place in which it hadn’t been seen for over a century. Scientists say that species extinction occurs naturally at a…
read more ›

Thoughts on Reintegrating Urban Ecology

To quote urban planning expert Timothy Beatley, whom we interview in the 2013 Winter Solstice issue of Leaf Litter, “We are an urbanized world now.” According to the 2012 World Population Data Sheet, 51% of the world’s population—more than ever before--now lives in urban areas. In many urban communities, something else is starting to…
read more ›

Post-Sandy plight of the plover: balancing storm & habitat protection

I recently read an article on Asbury Park Press about how piping plover numbers were down even though superstorm Sandy actually created more plover habitat in New Jersey. I heard a similar message last Thursday at the Jamaica Bay Symposium from Hanem Abouelezz, a biologist with the National Park Service in reference to Rockaway Beach.…
read more ›