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Keith Bowers WVU Commencement Speech

    WVU 2014 Commencement Speech delivered by Keith Bowers, President of Biohabitats Davis School of Agricutlure, Natural Resources and Design Keith Bowers   Thank you, Dean Robison, for that introduction. I am truly honored to be with you today for your commencement. Personally, I believe you are all graduating from…
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Integrated Water Strategies: Thinking outside the pipe

Despite the realities faced by many regions of the world today--record droughts, increased water scarcity, aging stormwater infrastructure and related pollution--many of us still take water for granted. When we need it, we turn on a faucet, pipes bring it in, and when we’re done, it drains down a pipe and out of our…
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Ecocidal Despair

This morning, my colleague Amy shared an article from this weekend's New York Times Magazine entitled "It's the End of the World as We Know it...and He Feels Fine." It's about author, one time deputy editor of The Ecologist, and former environmental activist Paul Kingsnorth, who now now says,"We aren't going to stop climate change"…
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Thoughts on Threatened Species

Thoughts on Threatened Species It is true that in nature, species come and species go. On rare occasions they even return. Just last week, a globally rare plant, Lobelia boykinii (Boykin's lobelia), resurfaced in Delaware, a place in which it hadn’t been seen for over a century. Scientists say that species extinction occurs naturally at a…
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Thoughts on Reintegrating Urban Ecology

To quote urban planning expert Timothy Beatley, whom we interview in the 2013 Winter Solstice issue of Leaf Litter, “We are an urbanized world now.” According to the 2012 World Population Data Sheet, 51% of the world’s population—more than ever before--now lives in urban areas. In many urban communities, something else is starting to grow along…
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Post-Sandy plight of the plover: balancing storm & habitat protection

I recently read an article on Asbury Park Press about how piping plover numbers were down even though superstorm Sandy actually created more plover habitat in New Jersey. I heard a similar message last Thursday at the Jamaica Bay Symposium from Hanem Abouelezz, a biologist with the National Park Service in reference to Rockaway Beach.…
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Tomorrow’s eco-professionals bring much needed hope – and action

When you work in an environmental field, you get used to the daily barrage or alarming news: dying whitebark pine...thinning Arctic ice...dwindling coastal wetlands, etc.  Despite the great work we do at Biohabitats to restore the Earth and inspire ecological stewardship, it can sometimes feel like the "doom and gloom" news ticker is constantly crawling…
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Let’s fix this lack of diversity in science & engineering!

I was one of the only female scientists in Biohabitats when I joined the firm in 1998. Today, female scientists and engineers make up nearly half of our staff. Although the ratio of females to males in science careers has increased over the last several decades, this chart, posted by the National Science…
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Art + science = environmental awareness

Step inside the studio of artist Jann Rosen-Queralt “I am more comfortable in the water than I am on land,” says Jann Rosen-Queralt, a swimmer, scuba diver, and artist with environmental concerns. Upon entering her studio, this is immediately evident. Sitting atop an expansive work table is a maple cutout of the Chesapeake Bay…
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Role of art in ecological restoration, conservation & regenerative design

In the collaborative practices of ecological restoration, conservation planning and regenerative design, there are roles for engineers, biologists, landscape architects, geologists, planners, and many other professions. But what about artists? How can art enhance our efforts to restore the Earth and inspire ecological stewardship? Biohabitats explored this issue in the 2013 Summer Solstice…
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